About Brainglot
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Consolider Groups
Speech Perception, Production and Bilingualism
Cognitive Neuroscience of Auditory Perception and Attention
Group of Attention, Action and Perception
Computational and Theoretical Neuroscience
Neuropsychology and Functional Neuroimaging
Grammar and Bilingualism
 
 
 

Neuropsychology and Functional Neuroimaging (NFN)
 

Group Coordinator: César Ávila.

Group Members: Alfonso Barrós-Lorcertales, Juan Carlos Bustamante, Víctor Costumero,  Cristina Forn, Julio González, Maria Antònia Parcet, Aina Rodríguez-Pujadas, Patricia Román, Ana Sanjuán, Noelia Ventura,  Maya Visser

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GOALS OF THE GROUP

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The NFN group gathers faculty, post-docs, and students at the University Jaume I who are interested in a diverse number of research topics from basic neuroimaging to clinical populations. The fundamental questions addressed in our work include the study of brain mechanisms of reward processing; language processing in bilingualism; task switching and working memory; and emotion. Clinical research addresses the assessment and management of a wide range of behavioural and brain disorders, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, AD, ADHD, and drug abuse. Our research approach extends from behavioural experiments to detailed measurements of brain activity using structural and functional MRI (see Figure 1). The main research lines of our group will be conducted in collaboration with the SPPB group.

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SUBPROJECTS OF THE GROUP 

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Subproject 1: Anatomical substrates of cognitive control in bilinguals Nowadays it is known that bilinguals show an advantage in cognitive control as a result of the need to select and continuously change between languages. We will focus on how such differences between bilinguals and monolinguals can be related to differences in cerebral patterns, following previous research in our laboratory. Generally, attentional control tasks have been associated to activation in right inferior frontal and attentional control in linguistic tasks to left inferior frontal cortex. The fact that bilinguals seem to activate left inferior frontal cortex in both of them is of great relevance and deserving of further exploration. We will extend our preliminary data by running new studies using new switching and inhibitory control tasks that typically involved the right inferior frontal lobe. We will also investigate properties of bilingualism that can modulate this benefit in control processes such as age of acquisition or type of bilingualism.

Subproject 2: Neural basis of language processing in bilinguals Our research interest is to investigate how the brain implements two different languages in early, high proficient bilinguals in both production and comprehension. To this aim, we will run different functional and structural MRI experiments to investigate (1) the anatomic correlates of bilingualism using morphometry and DTI, (2) the possible differences in L1 neural organization using comprehension, lexical decision and naming tasks; and (3) the brain mechanism that served to shift between languages (see Figure 1).

  

 

 



Figure 1.  BOLD response in the left striatum during language switching in early, high proficient bilinguals.