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Consolider Groups
Speech Perception, Production and Bilingualism
Cognitive Neuroscience of Auditory Perception and Attention
Group of Attention, Action and Perception
Computational and Theoretical Neuroscience
Neuropsychology and Functional Neuroimaging
Grammar and Bilingualism
 
 
 

Noticias
June 16: Pre-Consolider Discussion: Catherine Best

  

     Next Friday, June 17th, Catherine Best will give a talk at our Consolider Seminar Series and  its fixed a pre-Consolider discussion on next Thursday June 16th at 3pm, room 55.230

  1.  Files of interest for the upcoming talk (17th of June, 2011) 
    

 
June 17: Talk by Prof. Catherine Best

 

Prof. Catherine Best from the MARCS Auditory Laboratories at the University of Western Sydney.

The title of her talk is: “The acquisition of phonological constancy: Cross-dialect word recognition by young children".

If you would like to have a chat with the speaker,  you can contact the Host (Núria Sébastian Gálles).  

Please, see below for the abstract.

Please note that you can find more information about forthcoming talks, locations, etc. on the WebPage of the CogNeuro Consolider Seminars 

 

 

Abstract:

Nineteen-month-olds detect minimal phonetic distinctions in both newly-learned and known words (e.g., BEAR– PEAR or *GAIR) more reliably than 14-month-olds. However, such single-phoneme manipulations cannot resolve whether children show a qualitative transition from recognizing words as experienced phonetic patterns to recognizing them as abstract phonological forms, or instead show continuous quantitative growth in their statistical tracking of experienced phonetic patterns. Best et al. (2009) used cross-dialect pronunciation differences, or regional accents, which alter a word's phonetic signature without changing its underlying identity, to probe phonological constancy. American English 14- month olds preferred familiar over unfamiliar word sets spoken in their native accent, but not spoken in the phonetically disparate non-native accent of Jamaican mesolect English. However, 19-month-olds preferred familiar words across both accents, thus the older group alone displayed phonological constancy by extending word recognition to the unfamiliar Jamaican accent. More recently we have examined how expressive vocabulary size and high phonetic variability affect children's word recognition, using a different native accent, Australian English, with Jamaican again as the non-native accent. The testing materials were also expanded to increase stimulus variability with a larger set of stimulus words, tokens and talkers. Australian 14- and 17-month-olds with vocabularies < 25 words failed to show a preference for familiar over unfamiliar words in either accent, suggesting that high phonetic variability disrupts even native-dialect word recognition if the child has a small vocabulary. However, 17-month-olds with vocabularies > 50 words showed a familiar-words preference in the native accent, while 19-month-olds with vocabularies > 100 words extended that familiarity preference to the non-native Jamaican accent as well. Thus vocabulary size is associated with the emergence of phonological constancy in word recognition across stimulus variability, first showing for the native accent at around the 50-word milestone, then extending to an unfamiliar and strikingly different accent at the 100+ word mark. Implications for current theories of spoken word-learning by young children will be discussed
 

 
June 10tht: Talk by Prof. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga

 

Friday June 10 at 12h in room 52.S29 at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

Title: "The Jennifer Aniston neuron"  by  Prof. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga from the Department of Engineering, University of Leicester.

If you would like to have a chat with the speaker,  you can contact the Host (Gustavo Deco). 

Please, see below for the abstract. 

Please note that you can find more information about forthcoming talks, locations, etc. on the WebPage of the CogNeuro Consolider Seminars 

 

 

Abstract:

We can easily recognize a person or an object in a fraction of a second even when seen under strikingly different conditions. How neurons are capable of creating such an invariant representation has been a hot topic of debate in Neuroscience. In epileptic patients candidates to surgery we analyzed the responses of neurons in the human medial temporal lobe to picture presentations. Several technical improvements led to the finding of 'abstract' neurons that fired selectively to different pictures of familiar individuals (e.g. Jennifer Aniston) and even to their written names. If time permits, I will also show that from the firing of these neurons it is possible to predict what the subjects are seeing and that subjects can voluntarily modify the neurons' firing to 'project thoughts'. Finally, I will discuss the possible function of these neurons.

 

 

 

 
Pre-Consolider Discussion: Rodrigo Quian-Quiroga

 

  

     Next Friday, June 10th, Quian-Quiroga will give a talk at our Consolider Seminar Series and  its fixed a pre-Consolider discussion on next Thursday June 9th at 3pm, room 55.230

  1.  Papers of interest for the upcoming talk (10th of June, 2011) 
    

 

 
January 21st: Talk by Prof. Sandra Waxman

 

THIS FRIDAY, January 21st at 12h in room 52.S25 at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra.  

Title: "Word learning: Linking infants' early conceptual and linguistic system." by  Prof. Sandra Waxman from the Department of Psychology, Northwestern University (USA). Please, see below for the abstract.

If you would like to have a chat with the speaker,  you can contact the Host (Núria Sebastián Gallés).

Please note that you can find more information about forthcoming talks, locations, etc. on the WebPage of the CogNeuro Consolider Seminars:

http://brainglot.upf.edu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=56

Abstract:

Word learning stands at the cross-road between human linguistic and conceptual organization. To learn the meaning of a word, infants must set their sights in two distinct directions. Facing the conceptual domain, they must form core concepts to capture the various relations among the objects and events that they encounter. Facing the linguistic domain, they must cull words and phrases from the melody of the human language in which they are immersed. Decades of research have revealed that even before they begin to speak, infants’ advances in each of these domains are powerfully linked. In this talk, I will review evidence for the link between object categorization and object naming across development and across languages. I will focus first on infants on the threshold of word learning and will then move on to present new evidence from infants as young as 3- and 4-months of age. I will suggest that throughout development, naming is a powerful engine for conceptual development, fueling the acquisition of the essential, rich relations that characterize our most powerful concepts.

 
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